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The Blaine Group, Inc.
A Total Communications Agency
8665 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 301, Beverly Hills, CA 90211
310/360-1499 · 310/360-1498 FAX · E-mail:  devon@blainegroupinc.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  July 6, 2015

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Devon Blaine
Al Plancher
The Blaine Group
310.360.1499
devon@blainegroupinc.com
al@blainegroupinc.com

INCIDENCE OF BUSINESSES SEEKING
RESTRAINING ORDERS INCREASES

Los Angeles, CA… When does a business typically seek a restraining order?

When it believes a former employee, customer, vendor, or other person is likely to commit an act of violence or otherwise harm the company, its employees or owners.

“Many employers are using the restraining order process to protect themselves from liability. For example, if there is an unruly employee or someone who is a credible threat of violence, the fact that they got a restraining order allows them to argue they did the prudent thing when confronted with a situation. If they don’t do it, and that employee shoots up the place, they will be faced with an argument that they didn’t do anything to protect the other employees or the work environment. In other words, they had notice and were negligent about doing something about it. It is no guarantee but allows for an argument on liability issues. There is a separate section, 527.8 of the California Code of Civil Procedure to cover the workplace,” noted Judge* Herbert Dodell.

The restraining order statute was passed in response to a real need. In 1978, the number of people who felt threatened or deliberately harassed enough to call the police was growing at such alarming rates that law enforcement claimed it was overwhelmed. Something had to be done! So the Legislature passed § 527.6 of the California Code of Civil Procedure to protect people from harassment of all sorts: physical, verbal, telephonic, and written. Today, some 36 years later, the law has expanded to include harassment via fax, email, texting, and even posting on Facebook or Twitter.

When it comes to restraining orders, Herbert Dodell has done it all.

Respondent’s attorney. Petitioner’s attorney. Presiding over restraining order cases.

Being on all three sides of restraining orders has earned Judge* Dodell the moniker of “the restraining order expert.” In fact, his URL is http://restrainingorders.expert.

Not only has Dodell represented those against whom restraining orders were sought but also those who sought a restraining order against someone whom they feared would harm them. He’s also heard hundreds of restraining order cases as the judge presiding over this type of case.

Permanent Restraining Orders

To get a permanent restraining order injunction, you have to show up at a hearing, present your evidence, and let the other person present evidence that contradicts yours. Think Judge Judy, with both sides telling their story, and someone like Herb Dodell deciding which party to believe. You have to present “clear and convincing evidence of a credible threat of violence” demonstrated by “a course of conduct” that has “no legitimate purpose,” a pattern of behavior composed of a series of acts over a period of time, however short, evidencing a “continuity of purpose.”

If you don’t, you won’t get that permanent injunction—at least you would not have in his court. When Herb was presiding over these cases, he expected real evidence and consequences. The law says he had to accept hearsay evidence when making his decision, but it didn’t say he had to give it any weight, so he gave it the weight it deserved. If he was going to issue a court order telling someone what they could not do or say, he expected you to persuade him that you weren’t just being inconvenienced; you really felt frightened or beleaguered.

Some cases are meritorious. Others are not.

If you have questions about restraining orders, go to http://restrainingorders.expert or contact the restraining order expert at (310) 824-1515.

*Judge Dodell continues to hear restraining order cases. He will not appear in any court on any restraining order case that is scheduled in any courthouse where he presides over these types of cases. This is to avoid any perception of a conflict of interest.


 

blaine_logo

The Blaine Group, Inc.
A Total Communications Agency
8665 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 301, Beverly Hills, CA 90211
310/360-1499 · 310/360-1498 FAX · E-mail: devon@blainegroupinc.com

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  June 15, 2015

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Devon Blaine
Al Plancher
The Blaine Group
310.360.1499
devon@blainegroupinc.com
al@blainegroupinc.com

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDERS

What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You…
For The Rest Of Your Life!

Los Angeles, CA… According to those who preside over and rule on Temporary Restraining Order requests, 85 percent are granted.

It’s an alarming statistic.

Why? A Temporary Restraining Order on your public record NEVER goes away. Even if a permanent restraining order is not granted at a subsequent hearing.

Potential employers, landlords, mortgage holders, and others can all see this on the public record when a background check is conducted. So will the police officer who stops you for a routine traffic matter. So can the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) agent as you attempt to board a plane.

Those are the long-term ramifications.

What about short-term?

Picture this: you’re working away at your job when a police officer suddenly appears at your cubical, hands you a piece of paper, and says, “You have 24 hours to turn over your firearms. If you don’t file notice with the court within 48 hours that you did so, you’re in contempt and can be sent to jail at the hearing.”

What in the world just happened?! You were served with a Temporary Restraining Order.

Even if the record is modified to indicate that the order is no longer in effect or has expired, the original entry remains in the inactive files for five years. Even if the court ultimately finds the petition for the order never had any validity in the first place. Even if the person who filed the petition doesn’t bother to show up at the hearing at all! The mark on your record remains.

As a Superior Court judge (pro tem), Herbert Dodell has seen many hundreds of petitions for temporary and permanent “prior restraint” orders and has presided at numerous hearings. He emphasizes that this type of court order is far more serious than you realize.

Throughout his career, Judge* Herbert Dodell, has been on all three sides of restraining orders: Respondent’s attorney, Petitioner’s attorney, presiding over restraining orders cases.

This has earned him the moniker of “the restraining order expert.” URL is restrainingorders.expert.

Temporary Restraining Orders, commonly referred to as TROs, are granted by judges like Dodell who sit alone in their chambers reading six-page petitions filed by somebody who isn’t happy with someone else.

In the most serious cases, the person who did the filing (Petitioner), honestly fears for their safety or well being if something isn’t done to stop the other person, called the Respondent, from getting to them, stalking them, harassing them, threatening them, or making their life a living nightmare. Think batterers released from jail, obsessed or vengeful ex-partners, unrequited lovers, and other bullies of all manner, ilk, and size. These Petitioners are the ones for whom the law was truly written, and judges take their circumstances very, very seriously. They don’t want to not help someone in real danger or under real strain of harassment.

In the vast majority of cases, though, the Petitioner is simply annoyed, angry, or aggravated because another person is creating too much noise, crossing over their property line, making a move on their significant other (real or perceived), or in some other way just plain irritating them beyond their level of tolerance. They feel harassed.

Too many showed up on Dodell’s bench as requests for an immediate TRO with a permanent-injunction hearing to be set two to three weeks later. That hearing is where the real decision is made but, by then, the Respondent has already paid the consequences.

To get a permanent restraining order injunction, you have to show up at a hearing, present your evidence, and let the other person present evidence that contradicts yours.

To get a temporary restraining order, though, all you have to do is fill out a form claiming that you feel threatened. You don’t have to prove anything, offer a shred of evidence, or file a police report. What’s more, you don’t even have to tell the other person you’ve filed against them until after it’s too late for them to do anything about it. In fact, in most instances, the Respondent doesn’t know what’s happened until just before the hearing.

This is the serious truth behind the law.

Bottom line is, some cases are meritorious. Others are not.

If you have questions about restraining orders, go to restrainingorders.expert or contact the restraining order expert at (310) 824-1515.

*Judge Dodell continues to hear restraining order cases. He will not appear in any court on any restraining order case that is scheduled in any courthouse where he presides over these types of cases. This is to avoid any perception of a conflict of interest.

TRO – Consumer Release

 


blaine_logo

The Blaine Group, Inc.
A Total Communications Agency
8665 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 301, Beverly Hills, CA 90211
310/360-1499 · 310/360-1498 FAX · E-mail: devon@blainegroupinc.com

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  May 11, 2015

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Devon Blaine
Al Plancher
The Blaine Group
310.360.1499
devon@blainegroupinc.com
al@blainegroupinc.com

INCIDENCE OF BUSINESSES SEEKING
RESTRAINING ORDERS INCREASES

Los Angeles, CA… When does a business typically seek a restraining order?

When it believes a former employee, customer, vendor, or other person is likely to commit an act of violence or otherwise harm the company, its employees or owners.

Being on all three sides of restraining orders has earned Judge* Herbert Dodell the moniker of “the restraining order expert.” In fact, his URL is restrainingorders.expert.

We invite you to schedule an interview with Judge* Herbert Dodell, the restraining order expert. URL is restrainingorders.expert.

The restraining order statute was passed in response to a real need. In 1978, the number of people who felt threatened or deliberately harassed enough to call the police was growing at such alarming rates that law enforcement claimed it was overwhelmed. Something had to be done! So the Legislature passed § 527.6 of the California Code of Civil Procedure to protect people from harassment of all sorts: physical, verbal, telephonic, and written. Today, some 36 years later, the law has expanded to include harassment via fax, email, texting, and even posting on Facebook or Twitter.

When it comes to restraining orders, Herbert Dodell has done it all.

Respondent’s attorney. Petitioner’s attorney. Presiding over restraining order cases.

Not only has Dodell represented those against whom restraining orders were sought but also those who sought a restraining order against someone whom they feared would harm them. He’s also heard hundreds of restraining order cases as the judge presiding over this type of case.

Permanent Restraining Orders

To get a permanent restraining order injunction, you have to show up at a hearing, present your evidence, and let the other person present evidence that contradicts yours. Think Judge Judy, with both sides telling their story, and someone like Herb Dodell deciding which party to believe. You have to present “clear and convincing evidence of a credible threat of violence” demonstrated by “a course of conduct” that has “no legitimate purpose,” a pattern of behavior composed of a series of acts over a period of time, however short, evidencing a “continuity of purpose.”

If you don’t, you won’t get that permanent injunction—at least you would not have in his court. When Herb was presiding over these cases, he expected real evidence and consequences. The law says he had to accept hearsay evidence when making his decision, but it didn’t say he had to give it any weight, so he gave it the weight it deserved. If he was going to issue a court order telling someone what they could not do or say, he expected you to persuade him that you weren’t just being inconvenienced; you really felt frightened or beleaguered.

Some cases are meritorious. Others are not.

If you have questions about restraining orders, go to restrainingorders.expert or contact the restraining order expert at (310) 824-1515.

*Judge Dodell continues to hear restraining order cases. He will not appear in any court on any restraining order case that is scheduled in any courthouse where he presides over these types of cases. This is to avoid any perception of a conflict of interest.

Restraining Orders – Business Release

 


blaine_logo

The Blaine Group, Inc.
A Total Communications Agency
8665 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 301, Beverly Hills, CA 90211
310/360-1499 · 310/360-1498 FAX · E-mail: devon@blainegroupinc.com

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  March 10, 2015

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Devon Blaine
Al Plancher
The Blaine Group
310.360.1499
devon@blainegroupinc.com
al@blainegroupinc.com

RESTRAINING ORDER EXPERT
FOCUSES ON NICHE AREA OF LAW

Los Angeles, CA… When it comes to restraining orders, Herbert Dodell has done it all.

Respondent’s attorney. Petitioner’s attorney. Presiding over restraining order cases.

Being on all three sides of restraining orders has earned Judge* Herbert Dodell the moniker of “the restraining order expert.” In fact, his URL is http://restrainingorders.expert.

Not only has Dodell represented those against whom restraining orders were sought but also those who sought a restraining order against someone whom they feared would harm them. He’s also heard hundreds of restraining order cases as the judge presiding over this type of case.

Like most laws, the restraining order statute was passed in response to a real need. In 1978, the number of people who felt threatened or deliberately harassed enough to call the police was growing at such alarming rates that law enforcement claimed it was overwhelmed. Something had to be done! So the Legislature passed §527.6 of the California Code of Civil Procedure to protect people from harassment of all sorts: physical, verbal, telephonic, and written. Today, some 36 years later, the law has expanded to include harassment via fax, email, texting, and even posting on Facebook or Twitter.

Permanent Restraining Orders

To get a permanent restraining order injunction, you have to show up at a hearing, present your evidence, and let the other person present evidence that contradicts yours. Think Judge Judy, with both sides telling their story, and someone like Herb Dodell deciding which party to believe. You have to present “clear and convincing evidence of a credible threat of violence” demonstrated by “a course of conduct” that has “no legitimate purpose,” a pattern of behavior composed of a series of acts over a period of time, however short, evidencing a “continuity of purpose.”

If you don’t, you won’t get that permanent injunction—at least you would not have in his court.

When Herb was presiding over these cases, he expected real evidence and consequences. The law says he had to accept hearsay evidence when making his decision, but it didn’t say he had to give it any weight, so he gave it the weight it deserved. If he was going to issue a court order telling someone what they could not do or say, he expected you to persuade him that you weren’t just being inconvenienced; you really felt frightened or beleaguered.

Some cases are meritorious. Others are not.

If you have questions about restraining orders, go to http://restrainingorders.expert or contact the restraining order expert at (310) 824-1515.

*Judge Dodell continues to hear restraining order cases. He will not appear in any court on any restraining order case that is scheduled in any courthouse where he presides over these types of cases. This is to avoid any perception of a conflict of interest.

Restraining Orders – Consumer Release